The Money Graph on Ebook Angst

From page 5 of the Peanut Press vet’s screed:

On a more personal level, it’s like Peanut Press never happened, which partially explains the defiance and resentment with which I began this article.

Difference is that, this time, big publishers saw their ebook sales increase 4-fold in the Year of our Kindle 1, despite supposed device flaws and persistent lack of availability.  They care so much for the non-dedicated device market the top ebook publisher just dropped out of the market entirely.

But… maybe the big guys’ll still be willing to drop $1,500 on conferences where they can go and hear what it is they’re doing wrong from individuals with no verifiable book sales whatsoever!

Small or large, publishers just love that experience.

Remember kids, non-existence can be a beautiful thing… particularly if existence would have killed you during a season of skyrocketing shipping costs.

About dmoynihan

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  • DMCunney

    Ah, yes: “big publishers saw their ebook sales increase 4-fold in the Year of our Kindle 1″, referring to a quote from Random House CEO Dohle.

    “Random House e-book publishing programmes would continue to grow, with Dohle pointing to a 400% growth in e-book sales in the US over the past year.”

    I’d be more enthused if actual *numbers* ever got mentioned. Hey, if I sold one ebook last year, and 4 this year, it’s a 400% increase…

    And there’s no indication of what part of that volume may have come from the Kindle.

    (Though there’s money in them that ebook hills: Baen reports doing better from their Webscriptions program than from all foreign sales combined.)

    And “They care so much for the non-dedicated device market the top ebook publisher just dropped out of the market entirely.” Well, under the circumstances, you can’t blame them. It’s an example of the Internet eroding traditional sales and distribution channels. How do you enforce agreements about who can sell what where, when anyone can largely sell anything to anyone over the Internet? I think Hachette is worried about lawsuits from outraged channel partners who thought *they* had the exclusive rights for particular areas.

  • http://www.munseys.com dmoynihan

    They were all making the 400% claim, so it does have the ring of a magic BS number, but on the other hand, if you take a look at the Kindle store and follow sales ranks, obsessively, the #s are insane (for me, sales of literary fiction are up exponentially for Olympia, and infinitely for Silk. Smut isn’t up on that scale, but then I’ve kept 2/3rds of my list off as dry powder until availability and demographics improve, whereas all the reputable titles were in first day).

    For Hachette, they’ve never issued a statement as to why the titles were pulled from other networks, or what threat of litigation they faced. BoB did that.

    And since Twlights 1-4 were the top ebooks of ’08, ya gotta think if they saw significant revenue, they’d've used their clout and made deals. Biggest sign was the complete lack of follow-up in the trades.